How To Re-Route Using a Garmin 800

The technique described below may work in a similar way on other Garmin models and on other sat navs and navigation devices but they have not been tested.

What do you do if you are navigating a route or course using your Garmin 800 and you get lost?  Perhaps you lost concentration and suddenly realise that you should have made a turn and are now miles away from the route.  Do you retrace your steps? Or should you use the ‘recalculate route’ function?

The answer is probably neither.

There is probably a quicker way back to your intended route than following back the way you have just come.  If nothing else, retracing your steps is demoralising.  But you shouldn’t use the recalculate route option either.

When I first started using a sat nav I thought that if I got lost and rerouted then the sat nav would take me back to the closest part of my loaded route, after all, if I was using a paper map that is what I would do.  Unfortunately the sat nav is not that sophisticated: it will simply take the point where you are and your final destination and then plot a new route between the two, based upon the settings you have given it (things like avoid highways, avoid tolls etc..).  This is unlikely to be the same route you loaded, especially if you are on a circular route.

So how can you navigate back to the route without losing the original navigation on your route?

Step One

First Image for Lands End to John O'Groats - How to Re-Route Using a Garmin 800
Flick through the screens on your Garmin until you locate the map screen.  Zoom the view out by clicking on the ‘-’ symbol until you can see your route.  By eye locate a point on your route where you could re-join it.  Then zoom in on the point using the ‘+’.  You will probably have to move around on the map if you are some distance from your route.  To do this click on the ‘arrows’ symbol and then drag your finger around the screen to move the map.

Step Two

Second image for Lands End to John O'Groats - How to Re-Route Using a Garmin 800
Once you have located the point where you would like to re-join the route and zoomed in to get sufficient detail, press that point on the screen with your finger.  A large pin should appear.  You can drag it around if it is not quite in the right place.

Step Three

Third Image for Lands End to John O'Groats - How to Re-Route Using a Garmin 800

Now press the location name box or the symbol with three lines at the top of the screen.  A new screen will appear giving a grid reference for the point and the distance to it (in a straight line).  Click on the Go button at the bottom of the screen.

Step Four

Fourth Lands End to John O'Groats - How to Re-Route Using a Garmin 800

The sat nav will now navigate you to the selected point.  Once you reach that point and re-join your original route the sat nav should then automatically continue navigating along that route.

You can also use this technique to navigate around impassable obstructions, such as closed roads (although few are closed enough to stop a determined cyclist) or obstructed paths.  You may have to do a two part operation though, one to take you away from the obstruction and another to get you back to the route, otherwise the sat nav will probably just route you through the obstruction again, after all, it doesn’t know it is there!

Kickstart your Lands End to John O’Groats planning

Land's End to John O'Groats Route Book Special Offer - image

Download FREE samples

Everything you need to know to get you started on your Lands End to John O Groats adventure is contained within these three books: a How To, a detailed account of riding the Google Map route for LEJOG and a ‘safe’ Route Book using GPX files.

Available as electronic or paperback books from as little as £2.99 each or all three for £5.98.  That’s less than an inner tube or a Costa coffee with a slice of cake.

Where to next?

The most popular pages on the site concern planning your End to End, including training for long distance cycling, thinking about the cycling equipment you will need, how to look after your bike, what you should be eating and drinking whilst cycling and how to create a route for Lands End to John O’Groats. Or you can read my own account of cycling End to End to get some idea of what to expect.


Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Guide Image of Man Lifting Page

Why Use Google Mapping?

[At the time of typing ]Google Maps provides the best all round performance for cycle routing.  There are other sites that can provide you with a gpx file of your route or written directions or a saved copy of your route but only Google Maps can provide ALL of them. [Although you can only get all of them out of Google if you know the tricks (see above) and use third party software to convert the route to gpx file format].

Beyond this Google Maps is also very easy to use (once you have a little familiarity with it) and you can produce even quite complex routes very quickly.

Another big advantage of Google Maps is the ability to be able to switch to satellite view which gives you a much better idea of terrain.  It is also very helpful in working out exactly what is going on at junctions and roundabouts, which might be confusing on the map. 

Image of man holding binoculars for LEJOG Why Use Google Maps

My favourite feature is the little golden yellow chap in the controls that you can drag and drop onto the map.  He then acts as a set of eyes at street level so you can see exactly what is there (or at least exactly what was there when the photos were taken).  This is a great feature which allows you to pan around 360 degrees, zoom in and out and even travel along the road.Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Guide Image of Man Lifting Page

How to get a route from Google My Maps to a GPS Device

If you also want to create a gpx file of the route for a navigation device then follow the instructions below.

1. If you do not already have the map open then open your web browser and search for ‘google my maps’ (see Route Creation Seven).

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Ten

2. On the next screen locate the map you wish to create the gpx for and click on the image icon to open it (see Route Creation Eight).

Image for Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Eight

3. Click on the ‘Share’ icon (see Route Creation Ten). 

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Ten

4. On the next screen right click the highlighted URL link and select ‘Copy’ from the popup menu (see Route Creation Eleven). Then click ‘Change’ and on the next screen change the access rights to ‘Anyone with the link’ and click ‘Save’ (see Route Creation Twelve). This is important otherwise in the next steps you will get an error.  Then click ‘Done’ (see Route Creation Eleven).

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Eleven

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Twelve

5. Go to www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input?convert_output=gpx and paste the URL link address where it says ‘provide the URL of a file on the Web’, tick GPX and click the Convert button (see Route Creation Thirteen).

NB. If you would like elevation details for your route, before you click Convert click the little arrow by ‘add DEM elevation data’ and select ‘from best available source’.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Thirteen

6. Once the route has been converted click the download link and save as [filename].gpx (see Route Creation Fourteen). Remember to call the file something more convenient than the name automatically allocated to it, eg ‘end to end – Day 1’ If you forget when you download it then go to the file location and rename it before creating any more routes otherwise you’ll never tell them apart.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Fourteen

7. If you have added elevation data you can return to www .gpsvisualizer and under ‘Map this data’ click ‘elevation profile’. This will provide you with a graph of the route profile. You can download this or print it direct. I would advocate downloading it because this will give you the opportunity to manipulate the image if you want to.

You should now have your route saved as a Google My Map with printable route directions and a gpx file ready to upload to your gps unit, using whatever software the manufacturer recommends. I have a Garmin and I copy the files direct to the unit by attaching it via a USB port and using Windows Explorer. There is a GPX folder and I simply copy them into it.

Kickstart your Lands End to John O’Groats planning

Land's End to John O'Groats Route Book Special Offer - image

Download FREE samples

Everything you need to know to get you started on your Lands End to John O Groats adventure is contained within these three books: a How To, a detailed account of riding the Google Map route for LEJOG and a ‘safe’ Route Book using GPX files.

Available as electronic or paperback books from as little as £2.99 each or all three for £5.98.  That’s less than an inner tube or a Costa coffee with a slice of cake.

Where to next?

The most popular pages on the site concern planning your End to End, including training for long distance cycling, thinking about the cycling equipment you will need, how to look after your bike, what you should be eating and drinking whilst cycling and how to create a route for Lands End to John O’Groats. Or you can read my own account of cycling End to End to get some idea of what to expect.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Guide Image of Man Lifting Page

How to create a Lands End to John O’Groats cycle route using Google Maps

The first step is to creating a Lands End to John O’Groats cycle route on Google Maps is to open your web browser and search for ‘google my maps’ (see Route Creation One).

Image for Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image One

 On the next screen click ‘Create a New Map’ (see Route Creation Two).

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Two

If you are not already logged into a google account you will be prompted to log in or create an account. If you need to create an account follow the instructions on screen and then, if necessary, start this process from the top.

On the next screen, first click on the directions icon near the top, middle of the map. This will open a box on the left where directions can be inserted. Type in your start point in the ‘A’ box and your destination in the ‘B’ box (see Route Creation Three where the start location is slightly obscured by the pop up box). The more precise you can be the less fiddling you will have later [you can even put in grid references]. A driving route should appear on the map. 

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Three

Now click on the word ‘driving’ next to the car symbol and click the bicycle icon on the pop up. The map should now show cycle routes in addition to roads and it is likely that the route will adjust to select Google’s suggested cycle route. This is shown in Route Creation Four (ignore the branch off to ‘C’ for the moment).

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Four

You can add more destination points by clicking on ‘Add destination’. You can then rearrange the order of the destinations by dragging and dropping the letters by the typed destinations. Route Creation Four shows the screen just before releasing the move of the added destination ‘Sparkwell’ to be between Ivybridge and Plymouth. The route line is still showing the route as Ivybridge to Plymouth to Sparkwell.
Route Creation Five shows the map once the ‘Sparkwell’ destination has been moved.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Five

You may now wish to fine tune your route. The first thing to do is check that the start and finish locations are correct. To do this point your mouse cursor just below the ‘A’ and double left click. This should zoom you in on the map. You may need to repeat this process a couple of times to get sufficient detail. Alternatively you can use the roller on your mouse to zoom in and out if you have one.

If the start position is not quite in the right place then drag and drop it to the actual start. To do this, first click on the hand symbol indicated on Route Creation Five. Then point your mouse cursor at the ‘A’ and click and hold down the left mouse button. Whilst holding the button down, move the ‘A’ around the screen using your mouse. As you move the mouse around you will note that the route changes to follow. Once you have located the correct start position release the mouse button.

To change the other destination points zoom out on the map using the mouse roller or the zoom scroll bar on the screen until you can see them and then repeat the above.

You can further fine tune the map by grabbing the route line at any point and dragging it around the map. If you hover your mouse cursor over the route line you will note that a small white circle appears with the words ‘Drag to change route’ (see Route Creation Five). The mouse icon will also change to a pointing finger. In the same way as moving the destination points you can grab the circle (by left clicking and holding the button down) and drag it around the map. If you hover the circle at any point on the map, after a couple of seconds you will see that the route line changes to show you what the route would look like if you were to drop the circle there. (Essential you are telling Google Maps that the route MUST go to the point where the white circle is.) Drag the circle around until you are happy with the route then release the mouse button to drop the circle. It may be that you will have to repeat this process several times at different points along the route in order to get your ideal route.

Please note that there is a limit to the number of drag points you can use on any single route. Therefore, if you have a long route or it is particularly complex you may have to break it into parts and save each one separately.

Once you are happy with the route shown on the map you can name it by clicking on the words ‘Untitled map’ (see Route Creation Six) and filling in the relevant details on the pop up box. The map will be saved under your ‘My Maps’ with that title.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Creation - Image Six

If you wish to create written directions click on the three vertical dots indicated on Route Creation Six and then select ‘Step-by-step directions’ from the dropdown list. Copy the directions that appear by clicking (and holding down) your left mouse button at the top of the directions and then pulling the mouse down (still holding the mouse button down) until all the directions are highlighted (you will need to scroll downwards by dragging your mouse down the screen). Once you have all the directions highlighted, release the left mouse button and point the cursor somewhere in the highlighted area. Now click the right mouse button and select ‘copy’ from the drop down menu. 

Having taken a copy of the directions you need to paste them somewhere. Personally I use MS Word. Simply open a blank document, click the right hand mouse button whilst the cursor is somewhere in the document and select paste from the drop down menu. 

Now save this document to a convenient location on your computer or a data stick (in a folder called ‘cycle routes’ or ‘end to end route’ or similar). Remember to call the file something you can easily recognise, e.g. ‘end to end directions – Day 1’. Once saved, you can return to the document at any time to make amendments (if required) and to print.

You should now have a Google My Map and a set of amendable written directions saved.

 

Kickstart your Lands End to John O’Groats planning

Land's End to John O'Groats Route Book Special Offer - image

Download FREE samples

Everything you need to know to get you started on your Lands End to John O Groats adventure is contained within these three books: a How To, a detailed account of riding the Google Map route for LEJOG and a ‘safe’ Route Book using GPX files.

Available as electronic or paperback books from as little as £2.99 each or all three for £5.98.  That’s less than an inner tube or a Costa coffee with a slice of cake.

Where to next?

The most popular pages on the site concern planning your End to End, including training for long distance cycling, thinking about the cycling equipment you will need, how to look after your bike, what you should be eating and drinking whilst cycling and how to create a route for Lands End to John O’Groats. Or you can read my own account of cycling End to End to get some idea of what to expect.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Guide Image of Man Lifting Page

Route creation

Elsewhere on the site I recommended that you create your own route and I have set out below some ideas on how you could do this and the types of things you will want to consider when doing so.

However, now that this site has been active for a few years it is clear that many people would like to follow a route that has already been created, perhaps with a few modifications here and there.  I cannot recommend the route I rode on my first end to end.  In hindsight it is dangerous and not much fun, being largely on main roads.  In fact it has concerned me that someone would try and ride it and end up getting injured or killed.

So, I have been on a quest to find a much safer end to end route than the one I rode in 2009.   It has taken a long time but is now finally ready.  It is a quiet route using mainly small roads and lanes and utilising old railways, cycle-ways and canal tow paths.  The route is devised as a set of gpx files for use with a navigation device and comes with an accompanying book of information.  Links to the route on Google Map are also included so that you can amend the route anyway you like.  You can use the instruction on this site (and repeated in the accompanying book) to help you make amendments and to then create your own amended gpx files.

For more information about the route book click on the cover image below.

Lands End to John O Groats - A Safer Way on Tablet - Image

If you would like a flavour of the ride you might like to view the travelogue style book of my experiences when first test riding the initial route (Cycling the Google Route). The final route is still about 85% the same with the dodgy bits having been re-routed (and re-ridden). You can download a sample of the book (please note that I have to give you permission to access the file so it might take a little while for me to respond).

You can access other recommended routes at Amazon by clicking on the cover images below.

If you are keen to create your own route then, in principle, doing so is simple.  You have a defined start and finish and it is basically up or down, depending on where you start. Of course in reality it is not so simple. There are many factors to take into account:

  • How long are you planning for the tour?  Do you have time to wander or will you have to go in as straight a line as possible?
  • What sort of roads do you like to cycle on – flat, hilly, narrow, wide, quiet or busy (Busy roads do have some advantages: drag from lorries and juggernauts, they tend to be less hilly, average speeds are higher and there are actually less hazards on the main roads – but the consequences of an incident are much worse, so you’re less likely to have an accident or a spill but if you do you’ll probably be dead.)
  • Do you want to go as direct as possible or do you want to make sure you cover at least a 1000 miles as an extra challenge?
  • Why are you doing the trip – to see things or just to get there?
  • Are there specific places you would like to see?, e.g. St Ives, Dartmoor, Bath, Chester, Lake District, Gretna Green, Loch Ness, Cairngorms.
  • Do you want an extra challenge?  For instance you might want to incorporate some extra UK mainland ‘extremes’ with little extra mileage, e.g. most southerly point (Lizard Point) – most north easterly point  (Duncansby Head – not John O’Groats!) – most northerly point (Dunnet Head)
  • What sort of accommodation are you going to use?  Is it conveniently on your proposed route?

In most parts of the country there are many road options to get from A to B, so picking the right one is entirely dependent on your own personal preferences.  That is why I am not proposing that you use the route I rode.  For a start it would lead you direct to the door of each B&B I used and I wouldn’t necessarily endorse all of them!  And anyway, they may no longer be trading as B&Bs.

What you need is a methodology to create your own route, based upon your own requirements.  I am sure that many of you have tried and tested route creation techniques but others may feel, like I did, a little daunted at tackling a 900 mile route.

I started with a road atlas.  I used the primary road map at the front to fix the basic route with the distance table providing the ballpark stopping points, based upon how far I intended to ride each day – 150 miles.  This process pegged key points somewhere around John O’Groats, Fort Augustus (on Loch Ness), Glasgow, Windermere (Lake District), Shrewsbury, Taunton and Land’s End.

Image of Man Holding Globe for Lands End to John O'Groats

Having broken the 900 miles down into six daily chunks I then turned to the more detailed pages to try and find the most favourable roads for each day.  With my requirements of speed and distance in mind I looked at the primary routes first.  Where possible I selected old primary roads that often run alongside newer ones.  They are usually in good condition but much quieter than the new road or motorway that has taken their place.  Where the road looked good I marked it in with pen.  Where I wasn’t sure I left blanks.

Having completed this process I had a road atlas with a route marked most of the way through the country but with big gaps around Glasgow and right through the midlands.  Quite frankly the midlands had me quite scared.  The road atlas was just a big spaghetti splat of twisting red, blue and green lines.  I got headaches trying to follow roads from one page to the next.  Having no local knowledge of the area it looked like a nightmare of urban sprawl.  And the same was true of Glasgow but to a lesser extent, being a smaller area.

In the end I bit the bullet and penned in my line on the road atlas through the midlands but was still left with my Glasgow gap.  So I turned to the internet and searched on www.google.co.uk [other search engines are available] for bike routes through Glasgow.  I quickly found many possibilities and ultimately decided on a route that got me off the A82 at the first opportunity, to cross the Erskine Bridge.  This avoided the bulk of Glasgow completely but directed me more westerly than I had originally intended.  However, although it added a few extra miles to the route, ultimately it meant quieter but still primary route roads.

So, I now had my rough route marked in pen on my atlas. My next step was to find B&B accommodation at roughly 150 mile steps.  With my Glasgow bypass this would now be roughly Fort Augustus, Kilmarnock, Windermere, Shrewsbury and Taunton.  I returned to Google and searched for ‘B&B Fort Augustus’ and was presented with a list of options.  I browsed each site to decide which was the most suited to my needs (close to route/en suite if possible/cheap) and made contact with my preferred option asking:

a)    if they had single availability on my chosen date.

b)    if they had anywhere I could store my bike.

c)    if they would be willing to accept delivery of a parcel on my behalf a couple of days before my arrival.

d)    whether potentially arriving late in the day would be a problem.

e)    what the cost was.

I then booked the best option and printed out a directions map from the website to show the B&B’s location compared to my main road route. This process was then repeated for the other stopping areas.  My only sticking points in the process were in the Lake District and around Taunton.  In the former I ended up in Kendal rather than Windermere (because it was considerably cheaper) and in the latter I found few options near the route and had to detour down some twisty lanes for a few miles (as it turned out a detour well worth taking for the accommodation – see day 5 in the section describing my route).

Fortunately, probably because I was booking a few months in advance, I managed to get into my first choice accommodation at each stopping point.

I marked the B&Bs on my atlas and re-jigged the route accordingly.  So now I had my entire route penned in on the atlas (a little messy in areas).  However, I had decided that I didn’t want to carry any paper maps with me (no room in my bag – full of other stuff!) so what I really wanted was a written route sheet telling me which way to turn at each junction and the distances between instructions.  Having taken out a small mortgage to buy a sat nav I thought it would be a good idea to have the route on there as well.  The sat nav also had a map of the whole UK on it as back-up, providing the battery didn’t give up at the critical moment.

Back on the internet I Googled ‘bike route creation’.  At the time there were only a couple of options available and I chose www.bikely.com.  Following the instructions I created a separate route for each stage and then laboriously followed the route through on screen, writing down instructions of what to do at each junction and the distance to that point.  These were later typed up to create my route sheet (see appendix).

Since then I have discovered a much better way to create directions and gpx files by using Google Maps.

Of course what you actually take with you in terms of directions and maps is a matter of personal preference.  You could just set off with a list of town names you are going to pass through or near and navigate by road signs.  Or you might want to have written directions and detailed maps of the whole route.

Whilst I did without maps I did have a very detailed route sheet.  And when I did lose my way I used my portable navigation device to put me back on track.  [Not my sat nav, which I hadn’t mastered when I started the ride.  I used my mobile to call my wife who told me where to go.  Luckily she also got the road atlas out and gave me directions.]

Kickstart your Lands End to John O’Groats planning

Land's End to John O'Groats Route Book Special Offer - image

Download FREE samples

Everything you need to know to get you started on your Lands End to John O Groats adventure is contained within these three books: a How To, a detailed account of riding the Google Map route for LEJOG and a ‘safe’ Route Book using GPX files.

Available as electronic or paperback books from as little as £2.99 each or all three for £5.98.  That’s less than an inner tube or a Costa coffee with a slice of cake.

Where to next?

The most popular pages on the site concern planning your End to End, including training for long distance cycling, thinking about the cycling equipment you will need, how to look after your bike, what you should be eating and drinking whilst cycling and how to create a route for Lands End to John O’Groats. Or you can read my own account of cycling End to End to get some idea of what to expect.

Lands End to John O'Groats Cycle Route Guide Image of Man Lifting Page

How to Re-Route Using a Garmin 800

The technique described below may work in a similar way on other Garmin models and on other sat navs and navigation devices but they have not been tested.

What do you do if you are navigating a route or course using your Garmin 800 and you get lost? Perhaps you lost concentration and suddenly realise that you should have made a turn and are now miles away from the route.  Do you retrace your steps?  Or should you use the ‘recalculate route’ function?

The answer is probably neither. 

There is probably a quicker way back to your intended route than following back the way you have just come.  If nothing else, retracing your steps is demoralising.  But you shouldn’t use the recalculate route option either.

When I first started using a sat nav I thought that if I got lost and rerouted then the sat nav would take me back to the closest part of my loaded route, after all, if I was using a paper map that is what I would do. Unfortunately the sat nav is not that sophisticated: it will simply take the point where you are and your final destination and then plot a new route between the two, based upon the settings you have given it (things like avoid highways, avoid tolls etc..).  This is unlikely to be the same route you loaded, especially if you are on a circular route.

So how can you navigate back to the route without losing the original navigation on your route?

Step One

Flick through the screens on your Garmin until you locate the map screen.  Zoom the view out by clicking on the ‘-’ symbol until you can see your route.  By eye locate a point on your route where you could re-join it.  Then zoom in on the point using the ‘+’.  You will probably have to move around on the map if you are some distance from your route.  To do this click on the ‘arrows’ symbol and then drag your finger around the screen to move the map.

Step Two

Once you have located the point where you would like to re-join the route and zoomed in to get sufficient detail, press that point on the screen with your finger.  A large pin should appear.  You can drag it around if it is not quite in the right place.

Step Three

Now press the location name box or the symbol with three lines at the top of the screen.  A new screen will appear giving a grid reference for the point and the distance to it (in a straight line).  Click on the Go button at the bottom of the screen.

Step Four

The sat nav will now navigate you to the selected point.  Once you reach that point and re-join your original route the sat nav should then automatically continue navigating along that route.

You can also use this technique to navigate around impassable obstructions, such as closed roads (although few are closed enough to stop a determined cyclist) or obstructed paths.  You may have to do a two part operation though, one to take you away from the obstruction and another to get you back to the route, otherwise the sat nav will probably just route you through the obstruction again, after all, it doesn’t know it is there!

Iconic Climb on A9 Due to Change

The steep hairpin climb at Berriedale Braes on the A9 is the last really major effort that those heading north have to face before John O’Groats.  Its hairpin bend and then relentless slog up past the cemetery will be indelibly burnt into the memory of anyone who has completed the route.  But it looks like that might all change.

It appears that the hairpin bend causes more problems for trucks than cyclists and a new route has been proposed.  You will note that the new route (see below) is slightly longer but consequently might help to take the sting out of the climb.

When the changes will take place is unclear and the local authority has been accused of dragging its heels over the plan.

Incidentally, when I last cycled through in 2014 there were traffic lights before the hairpin, which were a complete pain.

What am I Doing With my Life?

Alongside 95% of the working population I have decided I do not like my job.  This is not a new state of affairs and accounts for my varied CV:  chef, retail manager, office manager, solicitor, horticulturist, household executive in charge of future assets (house husband) and IT project manager. I would like to add to the list – author.

I guess I can, I have seven published books.  However, the children’s book that I would like to write more of are difficult to sell without a massive amount of social media activity, something I cannot find the time for.  Equally, it is hard to fit writing cycling books into an already full life.

What I need is to be able to concentrate on the writing full time.  But finances do not permit that, so I have devised a plan to help me limp towards my goal.  I will write one cycling book each year until I have enough revenue to make the jump.  Of course, there is not a lot of royalty to be had from book sales these days so it may take many years but the journey has to start somewhere and the plan is for it to start now.

In June I will set out on a one or two week ride and then write the experience up for publication, hopefully before Christmas.  Undecided about which route to tackle I have conducted a one question survey.  The options were: Lands End to John O’Groats via Ireland, Roscoff to Santander and a ride going through every county in England.  So far the results are very evenly split between the last two.

In my initial planning for the All Counties route I ordered a map of the Sustrans routes around the country.  I was intrigued to note that there was a route from Lowestoft to St David’s (the East and West extremities of the UK) that had large chunks traffic free.  At some point it may be interesting to try the route to see how feasible it is for a road bike.  Therefore, I have added the route to the survey question.

It would be really helpful to me if you clicked through to the survey and added your weight to the vote.